Sign In
Use SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
  
  
Answer/Content
  
  
  
Yes, in most cases you can. You must contact one of the approved selection centers or an employing agency and provide them with documentation proving that you have worked at least one year as a full-time certified officer, and have comparable training to Florida’s basic recruit training program. Once the selection center or agency determines your eligibility, you will be issued an approved Application for Equivalency, CJSTC Form 76.

Upon receipt of this approval, you will have one year to demonstrate proficiency in the high liability areas (which may take one to two weeks) and pass the State Officer Certification Exam.

If you cannot complete this process within one year from receiving the approved Application for Equivalency, you must complete the full basic recruit training program pursuant to s. 943.131(2), F.S. You are only allowed one Equivalency
Yes
1
  
Per the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, you are only permitted three opportunities to pass.
Yes
2
  
Individuals who do not pass after three attempts must complete the applicable Basic Recruit Training Program and reapply to take the State Officer Certification Exam.
Yes
3
  
You are required to take the SOCE within one year of receiving the exemption, according to the Florida State Statute 943.121.
Yes
4
  
To assist you further with your course of study, you may review the Florida Department of Law Enforcement website.  Click on Basic Recruit Training Curriculum.  Scroll down the page for your respective criminal justice discipline.
No
5
  

Law Enforcement:  $1,445

 

No
6
CONTACT U​S
Broward College​
111 East Las Olas Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301
Phone: 954.201.7350
Webmaster​​
​​
CONNECT WITH US
        ​​
​ ​
Copyright ©​ 2017 | Broward College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, genetic information, national origin, marital status, sex, disability, or age in its programs and activities. ​
​​View our non-discrimination policies and Title IX.​​