Computer Literacy

AA and bachelors degree seeking students must fulfill the computer literacy requirement within the first 15 credit hours of enrollment at Broward College by successfully completing the CGS1060C course or by passing the computer competency test. However, AAS and AS may have to fulfill the requirement or the course according to their progam of study. This can be accomplished several ways depending on your program of study and pathway prerequisites. It is strongly recommended that you visit with your pathway advisor before taking the course or any of the testing options.

Broward College offers several computer literacy test options for students. All options are available at Broward College Testing Centers.

*Some programs require the completion of CGS1060C. However, there are some programs that allow alternate course options.

Consult with your pathway advisor to choose the correct option for you!

Computer Literacy Test Options

Cost: Link
Number of Attempts: 2 - even if you took the iC3 Fasttrack once already!
Retesting Policy: 24 hours
Testing Referral Required: Yes, Testing Referrals are provided by Academic Advising
Number of Questions: 65
Time Limit: 120 minutes (90 minutes for exam plus 30 minutes for setup)
Study Material: CGS1060C Course Outline
Question Types: Matching and Skill Simulation
Course Credit Awarded: No
Passing Score: 70%
Preparation for Test Day: Watch this video (2 minutes long)
Score Availability: Immediately after the conclusion of testing. Scores are entered into the student database within 24 hours and passing scores will satisfy the computer literacy requirement on the student record.

Cost: Link
Number of Attempts: 1
Testing Referral Required: Yes, Testing Referrals are provided by Academic Advising
Number of Questions: 45
Time Limit: 50 minutes
Study Material: IC3 Objectives Combined 2019
Question Types: Multiple Choice and Skill Simulation
Course Credit Awarded: No
Passing Score: 53 or 700 (depends on test date)
Score Availability: Immediately after the conclusion of testing. Scores are entered into the student database within 24 hours and passing scores will satisfy the computer literacy requirement on the student record.

Cost: Link
Number of Attempts: 2
Testing Referral Required: Yes, Testing Referrals are provided by Academic Advising
Number of Questions: 70
Time Limit: 90 minutes
Study Material: IC3 Objectives Combined 2019
Question Types: Multiple Choice and Skill Simulation
Course Credit Awarded: No
Passing Score: 60
Score Availability: Immediately after the conclusion of testing. Scores are entered into the student database within 24 hours and passing scores will satisfy the computer literacy requirement on the student record.

DSST Exam Title: Computing and Information Technology (Formerly, Introduction to Computing)
Passing Score: 45 or 400 depending on when the test was taken
Cost: Link
Number of Questions: 100
Time Limit: 120 minutes
Retesting Policy: 30 Days
Study Material: Link
Exam Information: Link (Offered at BC Testing Centers)
Course Credit Awarded: Yes, with passing score
Passing Score: 400
Course Credit Information: Link
Score Availability: Unofficial scores are available at the conclusion of the exam. Official scores are sent via mail to the school/institution you designated on test day. Official score reports usually take 90 days to be sent from DSST. Allow at least several weeks once the score report is received by the College for the scores to reflect in your official transcript. Information regarding DSST Transcripts and Score Reports can be found at this Link.

What skills does the Computer Literacy Test cover?

BC uses a version of the IC³ Training and Certification Program exam. The exam covers a broad range of computing knowledge and skills that proves competency in the areas described below. Students seeking to satisfy BC's Basic Student Technology Literacy Competency must demonstrate knowledge in the three exam areas: Computing Fundamentals, Key Applications, and Living Online.

Computer Hardware:
Identify types of computers, how they process information and how individual computers interact with other computing systems and devices
Identify the function of computer hardware components
Identify the factors that go into an individual or organizational decision on how to purchase computer equipment
Identify how to maintain computer equipment and solve common problems relating to computer hardware

Computer Software:
Identify how software and hardware work together to perform computing tasks and how software is developed and upgraded
Identify different types of software, general concepts relating to software categories, and the tasks to which each type of software is most suited or not suited
Identify fundamental concepts relating to database applications

Using an Operating System:
Identify what an operating system is and how it works, and solve common problems related to operating systems
Manipulate and control the Windows desktop, files and disks
Identify how to change system settings, install and remove software

Common Program Functions:
Be able to start and exit a Windows application and utilize sources of online help
Identify common on-screen elements of Windows applications, change application settings and manage files within an application
Perform common editing and formatting functions
Perform common printing functions

Word Processing Functions:
Be able to format text and documents including the ability to use automatic formatting tools
Be able to insert, edit and format tables in a document

Spreadsheet Functions:
Be able to modify worksheet data and structure and format data in a worksheet
Be able to sort data, manipulate data using formulas and functions and add and modify charts in a worksheet

Presentation Software:
Be able to create and format simple presentations

Networks and the Internet:
Identify network fundamentals and the benefits and risks of network computing
Identify the relationship between computer networks, other communications networks (like the telephone network) and the Internet

Electronic Mail:
Identify how electronic mail works
Identify how to use an electronic mail application
Identify the appropriate use of e-mail and e-mail related "netiquette"

Using the Internet:
Identify different types of information sources on the Internet
Be able to use a Web browsing application
Be able to search the Internet for information

The Impact of Computing and the Internet on Society:
Identify how computers are used in different areas of work, school, and home
Identify the risks of using computer hardware and software
Identify how to use the Internet safely, legally, and responsibly